The Rotary Club of Scottsdale welcomed the former distinguished member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1969-1983), Barry Goldwater, Jr.  While introducing Goldwater Jr, Rotarian Christopher West, noted that Goldwater Jr is the son of Barry Goldwater, U.S. senator from Arizona and Republican Party presidential nominee in 1964.  The Rotarians and guests were elated to learn that Goldwater Jr served as President of the Greater San Fernando California Rotary Club.
 
After retiring from politics, he moved to Los Angeles and pursued a career in the financial sector, specializing in security law and underwriting.  He became a member of NYSE and a partner in what is now Wedbush Securities.  Goldwater Jr now resides in Phoenix, near his son, Barry M. Goldwater III.  Goldwater Jr continues to champion the conservative political movement started by his father.  He serves as Chairman of a solar advocacy group and maintains his contacts with political leaders and activists, while he champions the conservative political movement started by his father. Goldwater Jr serves as Chairman of Nelson Taplin Goldwater (NTG) Consultants, a government relations firm primarily focused on the insurance industry.
 
During his talk, Goldwater shared his family's legacy of migrating to America from Poland in 1840 settling in San Francisco.  They were clothing merchants who followed the miners and army to Prescott AZ and grew the business into Goldwater's Department Store.  His uncle Morris, was Mayor of Prescott for 25 years and helped to write Arizona's constitution.
 
Goldwater declared that in a democracy, every four years we can elect a new president and every 2 years elect a new congress; and, that the watch dog role of the free press, which is important to a functioning democracy, needs to be impartial or independent.  As such, most of us now get our news off the internet. 
 
Goldwater Jr shared impassioned memories of watching his father come home from war.  He grew up dreaming of going to work with his father.  Little did he realize as a young 30 year old California congressman, he'd be walking down the Capital steps with his father in fulfillment of that dream.  Together they served in the US Congress for 14 years.  He learned from his father to stand up for what you believe in; to respect the land we walk on; to learn gratitude for what we have and where we come from; to know the importance of being kind to one another;  and, to always listen to what others say in order to learn from each other.  
 
As a Congressman, Goldwater Jr. was able to create the largest urban park in the U.S., the Santa Monica National Recreation Area.  He was the co-author along with former Congressman and NYC Mayor Ed Koch of the Privacy Act of 1974, which for the first time codified the concept of protecting personal privacy.  He served on the space committee and was there when Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins came home from their landing on the moon. 
 
Goldwater Jr stated Congress is different today.  For 14 years, he was always in the minority; yet, Democrats allowed the Republicans to participate and help craft bi-partisan solutions to our country's problems.  Republicans and Democrats got along.  Today, one sees anger and division, likely fueled by a partisan press and expanded social media.  The country is divided, yet it is in the same fights that Hamilton and Jefferson - and - John Maynard Keynes and Milton Freedman experienced - each butting heads as to who controls and who makes the rules. 
 
Goldwater Jr. responded to questions about California's changing politics, 3rd-party impact on the traditional two-party system, term limits and current issues needing attention - highways, healthcare and immigration policies.  After his talk, he signed copies of the book "Pure Goldwater" that he co-authored with his friend, Legal Council to the President Nixon, John Dean. 
 
 
On October 28, 2019, City of Scottsdale's Mayor Jim Lane dedicated the new concrete Scottsdale Rotary Park's ramada addition.  Rotary Park Plaza is located at 7959 E. Doubletree Ranch Road, Scottsdale, AZ.  This is approximately one mile south of Shea Blvd. and one mile east of Scottsdale Road, on the north side of Doubletree Ranch Road at Gainey Ranch Road.
 
The Mayor and Rotary Committee Chair, Ken Brown, extended special thanks to the park project's sponsors and contributors: James Carusone and the Salt River Materials Group (SRMG), The City of Scottsdale, and Rotarians James Hann Design, AIA and David Pastor; materials, equipment and accessories donation—SRMG; ready mix concrete delivery:  Rock Solid Concrete Construction; SRMG Staff and Walter Hoff (Lead), Mario Burns, Sr., and Mario Burns, Jr., and Ernie Whiting; concrete pumping:  Fleming and Sons - Derek Hauser, G.M. and Lee Hall, Operator.  Club President, Don Loose, extended thank you to the Rotary Club's Park Committee: Kenneth Brown, Craig Miller & James Flynn.  SRMG's representative and Rotarian James Carusone was presented with the American flag which flew above Rotary Park’s Unity Plaza April, 22, 2019—October 28. 2019. 
 
As part the dedication ceremony, members and guests of the Rotary Club of Scottsdale enjoyed its semi-annual Rotary Day at the Park.  Rotarian Carroll Huntress and owner of Scottsdale's Sugar Bowl, provided all the food; while Rotarian Ken Brown and friend of Club, Rob Adler barbecued brats and Sandy Miller handled setup and beverages; while Rotarian Gil Gifford arranged sound system. 
 
Scottsdale Rotary Park is an eight acre oasis in the heart of Gainey Ranch. The park was built by members of the Rotary Club of Scottsdale and then donated to the City of Scottsdale. The park features lighted walking paths, a children's playground, a greenbelt, picnic ramadas, a restroom facility and the world's first plaza designed in the shape of the Rotary symbol. In 2002 the Rotary Club of Scottsdale added Unity Plaza and the Spirit of Unity Flagpole to Rotary Park.  These were a Rotary International Centennial Project in commemoration of RI's 100th Anniversary in 2005. To learn more about the park or to make group reservations see: www.scottsdaleaz.gov/parks/rotary-park .
 
The Scottsdale Rotary Foundation offers naming and/or memorial opportunities (trees, flags, paver bricks and more) at Rotary Park Unity Plaza. 
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale welcomed Dr. Sybil Francis, President & CEO of Center for Future of Arizona (CFA), as its keynote speaker at a luncheon meeting held at McCormick Ranch Golf Club.  While introducing Dr. Francis, Rotarian Jim Bruner noted that Dr. Francis is a public policy architect committed to advancing innovative solutions with Arizona. She oversees CFA’s strategic innovations, research, partnerships and advances key initiatives that are at the core of CFA’s mission and work.
 
Prior to her move to Arizona in 2002, Dr. Francis’ public policy work focused on advancing the national science and technology enterprise. Dr. Francis began her career working in the U.S. House of Representatives and later served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and served as part of the leadership team of the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, a small private college in New York.
Dr. Francis serves on multiple boards and committees including: The Nature Conservancy Arizona Chapter Board of Trustees, Conservation and Public Policy Committee,  Expect More Arizona Statewide Advisory Council, and Arizona Business & Education Coalition Board of Directors. She is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Francis is founding member and Co-Chair of Arizona State University Foundation’s Women & Philanthropy program; a member of the Arizona Women’s Forum and Charter 100.
Dr. Francis earned her B.A. in Chemistry at Oberlin College and her Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition to her leadership role with the Center for the Future of Arizona, Dr. Francis is a key partner to her husband, ASU President Michael Crow, in forging connections between ASU and the community.
 
Per Dr. Francis, CFA brings Arizonans together to build a bright future for our state while impacting 200,000+ students, 5,260+ teachers, 200+ education leaders, 130+ communities and 80+ industry partners engaged across the state in education and workforce initiatives.   CFA measures progress of jobs, education, young talent, health & well-being, natural resources, infrastructure, civic participation and connected communities within Arizona.
 
During her talk, Dr. Francis indicated that 60% of Arizona residents originated from elsewhere - now and 100 years ago.  When talking about education, Dr. Francis noted that 3rd grade level of reading, student leadership, school principal leadership, civic engagement (learning democracy by doing) and schools' partnering with employers are  primary measurements of success.
 
Dr. Francis addressed questions about teacher unions, employer needs and school initiatives not being in sync, and the need for cooperation between schools and local leadership groups, such as, Rotary and Chamber of Commerce.  In closing, Dr. Francis asked Rotarians and guests to dream big and do it together.  
 
During the meeting Rotarians Cary and Susan Silverstein were honored with Paul Harris pins in recognition of their continued financial support of Rotary International Foundation. Kevin Maldonado, sponsored by Rotarians Lance Davidson and Richard Signeski, was welcomed as the Club's newest member.  Gretchen Kinder received her blue club membership badge in recognition of completing required new club member assignments.
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale welcomed Dr. William C. Harris, President and CEO of Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz), as its keynote speaker at a luncheon meeting held at McCormick Ranch Golf Club.  While introducing Dr. Harris, Rotarian Jim Bruner noted prior to joining SFAz, Dr. Harris was in Ireland serving as director general of Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), a new Irish agency that helped facilitate tremendous growth in Ireland’s R&D.  Immediately prior to going to Ireland, Dr. Harris was vice president of research and professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of South Carolina (USC). There, Dr. Harris oversaw research activities throughout the USC system, several interdisciplinary centers and institutes, the USC Research Foundation and sponsored research programs.
 
Dr. Harris served at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) from 1978 to 1996, including as the director for mathematical and physical sciences (1991-1996); where he was responsible for federal grants appropriation of $750 million.  He also established 25 Science and Technology Centers to support investigative, interdisciplinary research by multi-university consortia.  Earlier in his career, he catalyzed the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in the chemistry division and it became an NSF-wide activity.
 
In 2005, Dr. Harris was elected a member of the Irish Royal Academy, and received the Wiley Lifetime Achievement Award from California Polytechnic State University.  He has authored more than 50 research papers and review articles in spectroscopy and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Dr. Harris earned his undergraduate degree at the College of William and Mary, and received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of South Carolina.
 
Per Dr. Harris, in 2006, Arizona's political, education, business and philanthropic leadership made the decision to launch SFAz.  The mission of SFAz (office located in Scottsdale) is to diversify the state's economy by developing programs and partnerships that stimulate joint industry and university research and development, as well as, benefit state-based industries.  SFAz, a nonprofit public-private partnership was awarded its first grant in 2007. SFAz returns on its first seven years of research investment can be measured in quantifiable terms of revenue, high-salary jobs, companies, technologies, and talent generated and attracted.
 
Dr. Harris often referred to Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson's book "Jump-Starting America" which reflects upon a visionary plan that will lead to job growth and a new American economy in places now left behind. Beginning in 1940, massive public investment generated breakthroughs in science and technology that first helped win WWII and then created the most successful economy the world has ever seen. Private enterprise then built on these breakthroughs to create new industries--such as radar, jet engines, digital computers, mobile telecommunications, life-saving medicines, and the internet-- that became the catalyst for broader economic growth that generated millions of good jobs. 
 
Dr. Harris noted that the 1944 GI Bill resulted in significant number of GI's attending college and other significant jump-starts in industry included:
  • IBM in early 1950's;
  • 1957's Sputnik impact of US's competitiveness;
  • 1957-67 federal grants introduced to support new universities addressing technology, educational programs for teachers, and development of computer, biology and science research laboratories;
  • 1980's development of internet and computer science within universities.
 
Dr. Harris shared his experiencing significant advancements between 1985 to 2001 in China's development of laboratories, airports, and transportation (trains, highways..).  In closing, Dr. Harris acknowledged that ASU has developed into a world-class research university.  He stressed the need to depoliticize and build for the future for competitive good.  He theorized that within the US there will be 100 cities, likely to include Phoenix Valley, that will be have renown universities and a network of laboratories to educate, keep and grow talent that will change our country.
 
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale welcomed David Ramirez, Public Information Officer at City of Phoenix Aviation Department, as its keynote speaker at a luncheon meeting held at McCormick Ranch Golf Club.  During the program's introduction, Christopher West noted that David has held his position as PIO since 2009, has held various other City of Phoenix positions and had been a Arizona Republic staff reporter. 
 
David stated that Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, America's Friendliest Airport®, has an annual economic impact of more than $38 billion. Every day approximately 1,200 aircraft and more than 120,000 passengers arrive and depart at Sky Harbor.  In 2018, 45 million people traveled through the Airport.  In 1965, it served 1.6 million passengers.  David talked about the changes within the Airport's 3 terminals, 3 runways, 18 airlines serving the airport, and supporting airports (Deer Valley, Phoenix Goodyear..).  Terminal 3 was built in 1979 and is being modernized in 3 phases with the second phase being just completed and named John S McCain III Terminal 3. 
 
Recent changes to the airport include:  $27 million in upgrades within International Concourse in Terminal 4 - elevator, queuing, baggage and kiosks. Per Mark, Terminal 4 is the most used terminal (85% of travelers).  An eighth final concourse with 8 gates for Southwest is scheduled to be completed by 2022.   Of special note within Terminal 4 are the 30 new retail shops, trip advisor center, and urgent care center.  Of interest to the Rotarians was Phoenix Sky Harbor's people mover/train expansion, including planned addition of two more rail miles that will eventually go to the Airport's rental car center and a new hotel.
 
Other topics David addressed were: new animal relief areas; cell phone lots; airport's sustainability turf project (eliminated 5 million gallons of water usage and $400,000 in maintenance costs); recycling; solar energy; motorist services, valet and prepaid parking: customer service (400 "purple" navigators); airport's renown art museum; website Espanola upgrades; free Wi-Fi and charging stations; availability of phone checkpoint wait times; USO VIP area in terminal 4; airport tours; and, live music in concourses.
 
During the meeting, Club President, Don Loose welcomed the Club's newest Rotarian - Kristina Knudsen, of Barrow Neurological Foundation; and, congratulated Rotarian Douglass Snell for completing his new member tasks to earn his blue membership badge.
 
Additionally at the luncheon meeting, Cassidy Johnson, who serves as Rotary International District 5495 Interact Assistant Governor, Rotary Interact Executive Director at Scottsdale's Desert Mountain High School, and Interact Ambassador to Kenya, spoke about local Rotary youth support of Crutches 4 Africa international services project.  Cassidy shared highlights of a 3-week Rotary International trip made by a project team of 6 high school Rotary Interact high school students and 5 Rotarians.  The team personally delivered hundreds of mobility devices to those in need living in Uganda and Kenya.
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale celebrated its 65th season/year, by wrapping gifts at the Club's Childhood Cancer Awareness Wrap-A-Thon.  The community service project was done in partnership with Scottsdale's Arizona Cancer Foundation (ACF) for Children. ACF's mission is to provide social, emotional and financial support for Arizona families who are managing the health and well-being of a loved one with pediatric cancer.  ACF provides financial support to families for needed expenses related to the care of their "Cancer Warrior" child and living expenses.
 
The Founder and CEO of the Organization is Chrisie Funari, whose daughter, Ava died of cancer at the age of 5.  Instead of giving into her despair, Chrisie vowed she would do everything she could to help families going through the same devastating experiences. 
 
Twenty-six enthusiastic Rotarians, friends, family and colleagues participated in the 3-hour Wrap-A-Thon on September 21, 2019.  Over 200 donated and beautifully wrapped gifts will distributed in a few weeks to six ACF sponsored families.  
 
At the event, Monica Graffius, Executive Director of Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children, stated that no request by a family of a cancer warrior child is turned down.  The median income of these families is $41,000/year.  The Rotary Club of Scottsdale Foundation's donation of $2,500 will help families with their needs.
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale's Club President, Don Loose, extended gratitude to the event's many sponsors and supporters - Northern Trust, at 14624 N. Scottsdale Road, graciously provided their large conference room for the event.  Refreshments and rolls of wrapping paper were supplied through the Club's Foundation funds.  One of the many sponsors of donated gifts was Old Navy.  A special thank you was extended to Monica Graffius, Executive Director of the Arizona Cancer Foundation for her support and coordination with the Club's event's project leader, Rotarian Laura Biever.
 
See the Club's website for information about its upcoming key note speakers, projects and membership - www.scottsdalerotary.org or call 480-945-6158. For more information about Arizona Cancer Foundation see - www.azcancerfoundation.org.
 
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale welcomed Mark Stanton, President of the Scottsdale Chamber of Commerce, as its keynote speaker at the Club's weekly luncheon meeting held at McCormick Ranch Golf Club.  When introducing Mark, Rotarian David Arriola, noted that Mark has an accomplished background in marketing, communications, public affairs and business development through his work with businesses, government and non-profit organizations in the Valley. 
 
Mark has held prominent marketing and public relations leadership positions within the Valley, such as, chief of staff to Maricopa County Board's Supervisor Andy Kunasek; past chairman/member of the State of Arizona Personnel Board; past president and lifetime member of Scottsdale Charros; executive director of the Presidential Primary Debate held in Mesa, AZ; member of Paradise Valley Town Council; and, many other volunteer positions as an advocate for public safety, fiscal accountability and quality of life initiatives.
 
During his talk, Mark stated the Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to Scottsdale's regional businesses' community prosperity through advocacy, networking, connectivity, business education and being a voice for business through Chamber membership, programs, events, resource tools and customer service.  The Chamber's stakeholders include the City of Scottsdale, civic and non-profit groups, economic development partners, chamber members, businesses, visitors and residents.
 
During his talk, Mark shared specifics about several of the Chamber's economic and public policies between businesses and Scottsdale, as well as, the Chamber's advocacy and support of Scottsdale's Businesses United for Scottsdale School District.  In closing, Mark stated the goals of Scottsdale Chamber are to provide relevant and challenging pathways for businesses; to educate its members; to be a voice of business on business issues; to maintain a good relationship with the Phoenix Chamber; to create good relationships between businesses and schools; to actively support young people; and, to work with Uber and AirBnB on common issues.     
 
 
The Rotary Club of Scottsdale welcomed Christina Haines, President of Scottsdale Community College (SCC), as its keynote speaker at recent Club's weekly luncheon meeting held at McCormick Ranch Golf Club.  When introducing Chris, Rotarian Mike Savastio, noted that Chris has been working within the Maricopa County Community Colleges District since 1989.  She held various leadership positions and/or was adjunct instructor at Mesa, South Mountain, Chandler-Gilbert and Scottsdale Community Colleges. During 2015-18, Chris served as Interim President of Phoenix College. 
 
Her professional background also includes serving as coach and instructor at Baker University in Baldwin City, KS and Weber State University in Ogden, UT. Chris, who is the first in her family to earn a college degree, majored in political science/education at Black Hills State University and received a master's degree in Educational Counseling from Northern Arizona University.  She is currently ABD working on her dissertation in Educational Leadership/High Education at NAU.
 
During her talk to the Rotarians and guests, Dr. Haines (ABD) acknowledged and expressed gratitude to her mentors, former Rotary Club of Scottsdale Rotarians, Dr. Jan Gehler and Dr. Art DeCabooter - both former presidents of Scottsdale Community College.  She shared how SCC is preparing student for jobs "now," through the school's  class scheduling and keeping courses relevant and innovative.   
 
Rotarians were eager to ask Dr. Haines (ABD) questions about SCC's funding (property tax, tuition and grants) and SCC's tuition ($85 a credit, which has not been raised for the past 7-8 years).  Dr. Haines (ABD) closed her talk stating she spends 50% of her time raising dollars for the school, as well as, promoting the schools major departments, which include: arts (i.e. cinematography, video production, dance, drama, music, studio arts, web page and digital design...); business; education (i.e. elementary and physical education); health professions (i.e. LPN, nursing...); humanities; protective services (i.e. criminal justice and safety studies, police and criminal science..); science, technology and math; and, trades and personal services (i.e. culinary arts and food service...).
 
At the meeting, President Don Loose acknowledged Rotarians Craig Miller and Jason Brock, for 24 and 25 years respectively for perfect Rotary meeting attendance. Rotarian Jolene Hale was presented her "blue" membership badge in recognition of her completing all her new Rotarian assignments.  Justine Hurry was welcomed as Rotary Club of Scottsdale's newest Rotarian.
 
The Club is planning a community service wrap-a-thon project during Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children's Childhood Cancer Awareness month.  Rotarians will wrap presents for 30 adopted families on Saturday, September 21 from 9am to noon, at Northern Trust's Conference Room (14634 Scottsdale Road/#100).  See the Club's website for information about its upcoming Annual Golf Tournament Scholarship Fundraiser and upcoming key note speakers - www.scottsdalerotary.org or call 480-945-6158.